Open Voicing in Chord Inversions?

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KostaC
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Open Voicing in Chord Inversions?

Postby KostaC » Feb 05, 2013 6:17 pm

Open voicing is not available in the chord inversions section. It is very important for the ear to practise inversions with open voicings. Is there a chance to implement it? Thanks :)

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martijn
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Postby martijn » Feb 06, 2013 3:01 am

With the chord inversion exercise you will learn to recognize the root position and the first, second and third inversions of chords. These inversion names refer to specific configurations of the notes, in closed voicing.

For example, you can recognize the first inversion of a major triad by its minor third in the bottom, and its perfect 4th at the top.

If you are aware of music theory that names specific open voiced inversions we like to hear about it.
Martijn

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KostaC
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Postby KostaC » Feb 06, 2013 9:19 am

The theory of the inversions is always the same regardless closed or open voicing. For example: we have 1st inversion of C major (closed voicing) which is E - G - C. But what if we take that G and put it above the C? - Now we have
E - C - G which is still first inversion of C major (in open voicing). Other example: we have second inversion of C major which is G - C - E. No matter how we spread those C and E on the entire keyboard and no matter which one we put on top of other, as long as the G is on the bottom it is a second inversion. Conclusion: The bottom tone determines the inversion of the chord no matter how the other tones are spread on the entire keyboard.

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martijn
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Postby martijn » Feb 07, 2013 3:15 am

You can do what you want, more or less by doing chord identification, with open voicing. You then enter the chords on the piano or staff in the same voicing as you hear them. This will then force you to recognize their exact allignment.

Regarding the theory discussion about open voicing inversions:
I get your point about the role of the bass note, determining what inversion you have got.

I searched online for this, but could not find any source that called this "inversions". It probably would be more an open voiced chord with a differrent note in the bass (like e.g. C7/G, or Am/C...).

In music school I also deliberately learned that what we call inversions refer to these closed voicings, where (from root position) the first inversion has the roottone moved one octave up, and the second inversion has its roottone, and third moved one octave up.

Of course anyone on this forum is welcome to point to some theory that says otherwise.

No matter what we call this, we could always consider an exercise in which you have to guess the bass notes of open voiced chords, if this is wished for, by many customers.
Martijn

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KostaC
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Postby KostaC » Feb 07, 2013 9:33 am

I can now practice what i was looking in chord ID as you said, thanks.

It's a rare and interesting theory by some professionals but since i found a way to practice it, the problem is solved.

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alfredalfred
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Re: Open Voicing in Chord Inversions?

Postby alfredalfred » May 02, 2016 11:59 pm

For example, you can recognize the first inversion of a major triad by its minor third in the bottom, and its perfect 4th at the top???
waleeed

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KostaC
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Re: Open Voicing in Chord Inversions?

Postby KostaC » May 03, 2016 6:57 am

No. If the minor third of the first inverson of the major triad (E-G-C) which is G we put on the bottom that would be the second inversion because the bottom tone determines the inversion. As long as the E is on the bottom no matter what we put above it, it's still the first inversion.


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